Dr. Atif Mustafa Portfolio

Academic Qualifications | Honors, Awards and Training | Academic and Professional Experience | Projects

Professional Memberships | Publications | Teaching | Other Activities | Media/NewsContact

Academic Qualifications

PhD: Civil and Environmental Engineering
Institute for Infrastructure and Environment, School of Engineering
College of Science and Engineering
University of Edinburgh, UK (www.ed.ac.uk) 

ME: Environmental Engineering
Department of Environmental Engineering
NED University of Engineering & Technology, Karachi, Pakistan (www.neduet.edu.pk) 

BE: Civil Engineering
Department of Environmental Engineering
NED University of Engineering & Technology, Karachi, Pakistan (www.neduet.edu.pk)

Honors, Awards and Training

  • Awarded full financial assistantship from the Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA) for attending ten weeks group training course on “Heavy Metal & Other Hazardous Substance Pollution Control”, held at Osaka, Japan, 2005. 
  • Awarded full PhD scholarship from NED University, 2006.
  • Awarded funding from Edinburgh Development Trust to conduct research field trips in the British Isles, 2008. 
  • Won the first prize for poster at the National Telford Institute Workshop on Sustainable Urban Water Management – Promoting Top Research at Scottish Universities, 2009. 
  • Awarded research grant from NED University for a project entitled “Application of Solar Disinfection for Treatment of Contaminated Water”, 2010. 
  • Awarded funding from WWF-Pakistan for a research project entitled “Water Quality and Biodiversity of Urban Wetlands in Karachi”, 2013.
  • Awarded full financial assistantship from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) for attending six weeks group training course on “Integrated Coastal Management”, held at Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok, Thailand, 2014.

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Academic and Professional Experience

Associate Professor and Co-Chairman
April 2010 to date: Department of Environmental Engineering, NED University of Engineering and Technology Academic 
Responsibilities: Teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses, Student mentoring, Study projects, Dissertations 
Administrative Responsibilities: Manage the ME and MEM programmes 
Research: Development and management of research projects, Preparation of research proposals for funding agencies

Assistant Professor
April 2004 to April 2010: Department of Environmental Engineering, NED University of Engineering and Technology 
Academic Responsibilities: Teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses, conducting laboratory classes, Student mentoring 
Administrative Responsibilities: ISO Area Coordinator

Lecturer
April 2000 to April 2004: Department of Civil Engineering, NED University of Engineering and Technology 
Academic Responsibilities: Teaching undergraduate courses and conducting laboratory classes

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Projects

Process Safety Management Practices in Pakistan

Globally industries have successfully implemented Process Safety Management (PSM) systems which have enormously reduced incident magnitude, their dreadful repercussions, and have proven organisational stability thereby maximizing profit margins. Due to limited data access, lack of incident and near-miss reporting & recording trend, lack of understanding and implementation of process safety management, petroleum refining sector as one of the most prone-to-incident industries globally was selected as a base case to evaluate process safety management practices in Pakistan.

Link to relevant publication

Application of Solar Disinfection for Treatment of Contaminated Water

A sustainable and simple point of use household drinking water solar disinfection (SODIS) technology was successfully applied to treat microbiologically contaminated water. Field experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency of SODIS and evaluate the potential benefits and limitations of SODIS under local climatic conditions of Karachi, Pakistan. This is the first detailed scientific research on SODIS in Pakistan.
In order to enhance the efficiency of SODIS, the application of physical (black-backed rear surface and reflective surface batch reactors) interventions were also investigated. Physical interventions increased the temperature of water in the batch reactors and enhanced performance of SODIS. Moreover, an experiment was also conducted to determine concentration of plasticizers with and without application of SODIS. The project has been successfully completed.

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SODIS Experiment under progress at NED University

Link to relevant publication

Constructed Wetland for Wastewater Treatment

Conventional wastewater treatment plants involve large capital investments and operating costs. In developing countries most of these systems fail because of high energy and maintenance costs. Constructed wetlands are low-cost alternative for treatment of wastewater especially for those areas where land availability is not a problem. They are simple to build, easy to maintain and operate, and have relatively low energy requirements. A pilot-scale constructed wetland (CW) has been built at NED University. Treatment performance of this CW is being evaluated for various physical, chemical and microbiological parameters under local climatic conditions.

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Figure: Constructed Wetland at NED University

Link to relevant publication

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Treatment of Refinery Wastewater using Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands

Pilot scale constructed wetlands were used to treat refinery wastewater. The experimental set up consisted of four vertical flow constructed wetlands (CW) with different plants and media. CW 1 was planted with common reed (Phragmites), CW 2 was planted with phragmites plus additional layer of sludge over the media, CW 3 was planted with cattail (Typha) plus additional layer of sludge over the media while CW 4 was planted with Typha. Experiment was conducted at Karachi (Pakistan) with a warm humid summer (38ºC) and a normal cold winter (10ºC). After acclimatization period, wastewater from a local refinery was added manually to maintain a hydraulic loading rate of 85 mm/d. The four CW removed all monitored pollutants with good removal efficiencies during the initial monitoring period: turbidity (91%, 72%, 96%, 95%); suspended solids (87%, 86%, 86%, 73%), oil and grease (77%, 80%, 60%, 83%), COD (57%; 47%; 53%, 72%); BOD (37%, 49%, 33%, 36%); sulphate (62%, 77%, 85%, 76%), chloride (96%, 95%, 98%, 98%) and total phenol (68%, 98%, 98%, 97%). Overall CW 4 showed the best performance in removing pollutants. For phenol removal, CW 2 and CW 3 performed better than CW 1 and CW 4. With regard to type of plant species, wetlands with Typha performed better than those planted with Phragmites.

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Figure: Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands to Treat Refinery Wastewater

Link to relevant publication

Treatment of Produced Water from a Gas Field using Free Water Surface Wetland System

A pilot scale free water surface (FWS) wetland system was built at a gas field in Sindh province of Pakistan. The pilot system consisted of two treatment cells, cell 1 was planted with Phragmites while cell 2 with Typha. Initial monitoring of the wetlands for removal of hydrocarbons started in July 2013. The average influent BTEX values were as follows: benzene (0.9 mg/L), toulene (0.1 mg/L), ethyl benzene (0.2 mg/L), m-xylene (1 mg/L) and o-xylene (0.1 mg/L).The FWS wetland system removed all monitored contaminants with good removal efficiencies during the 6  months monitoring period: benzene (89.1%), toulene (89%), ethyl benzene (97%), m-xylene (88.1%) and o-xylene (80.2%). 

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Figure: Free Water Surface Wetland System in a Gas Field to Treat Produced Water

Link to relevant publication

Floating Constructed Wetland for Improving Wastewater Treatment Efficiency of a Pond System

Floating Constructed Wetland (FCW) is an innovative variant of constructed wetland technology in which stems of the plants remain above the water surface while their roots extend into the water column beneath the floating mats. A pond system treating wastewater at NED University campus was retrofitted with a FCW. The floating wetland was made using PE insulation sheets. Three different plant species were planted; Typha, Canna (Red, Green, Yellow and Green) and Cypreus Papyrus. The FCW improved TSS removal by 34 %, DO was also increased from 4.5 mg/L to 5.5 mg/L, indicating a 35% increase with introduction of FCW. The FCW also successfully stabilized organic matter. CW further improved the removal efficiency in the range of 26% - 46%. They also improved the nutrient removal efficiency and pathogen removal.
 

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Figure: Established plants in FCW placed in a Pond system

Link to relevant publication

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Waste materials as substrates in vertical flow constructed wetlands treating domestic wastewater

Vertical flow constructed wetlands (VFCW) are considered to be one of the most efficient type of wetlands and require a lesser footprint in comparison to other wetland types. Substrate is an important component of wetland. We used the common gravel (VFCW 1) and three waste materials: concrete (VFCW 2), slag concrete (VFCW 3) and coconut husk (VFCW 4) as substrates in experimental wetlands. All four experimental wetlands have been constructed in uPVC pipes, diameter and height of each VFCW was 89 mm and 1000 mm, respectively. A 15 mm dia perforated pipe that penetrates to the wetland bottom was installed in each wetland for passive aeration. Canna indica, an ornamental plant was planted in all four wetlands. Pre-treated wastewater from a wastewater treatment plant was added manually to all VFCW. The maximum plant height observed was 78.7 cm in VFCW 1 while minimum plant height observed was 53.3 cm in VFCW 3. The four VFCW removed all monitored contaminants with good removal efficiencies during the 8 months monitoring period: suspended solids (79%, 74%, 74%, 54%); BOD (54%, 42%, 42%, 2%); COD (54%; 47%; 44%, 34%); ammonia-nitrogen (54%, 46%, 38%, 38%), ortho-phosphate (67%, 61%, 64%, 53%);  and fecal coliforms (55%, 40%, 14%, 52%). DO levels increased for VFCW 1 and 4 and nitrate levels increased in all wetlands confirming the nitrification process. For the various waste materials used following were our observations: VFCW 2 performed the best for organic matter and ammonia-nitrogen removal while VFCW 3 outperformed others for phosphorus removal and VFCW 4 had the highest percentage of fecal coliforms removal.

Figure: Experimental setup for testing waste materials as substrates in vertical flow constructed wetlands

Link to relevant publication

Green Wall for Grey Water Treatment and Recycling At NEDUET Campus

The purpose of this project was to design, construct and test a Green Wall as a demonstration project at NEDUET campus. The system was developed using uPVC pipe (4 inches diameter and 15 feet long). The pipes were filled with waste concrete (coarse aggregates) to support the vegetation. More than ten species of ornamental plants including those that have energy potential were planted in the system. The system was monitored for various water quality parameters including pH, turbidity, suspended solids, BOD, COD, nutrients, total and fecal coliforms. The developed system successfully treated the grey water generated from the faculty washrooms of the civil engineering department. The results demonstrate that the system can provide multiple benefits including adding aesthetical feature to the building, improving air quality, saving energy cost by cooling effect and treating wastewater that can be reused for irrigation purposes.

Figure: Established green wall, Civil Engineering Department, NED University

Saline Water Reuse for Food and Fuel Production

This project focuses on using saline water for food and energy production. The project in ongoing and results are awaited.

Figure: Experimental setup for using saline water for food and energy production

Development of Urban Forest at NED University of Engineering and Technology

The Urban Forest project was initiated in collaboration with The Institution of Engineers, Pakistan (IEP), Karachi Center. Students of third year Urban Engineering were also involved in this project.  90 trees, 14 tree species were planted in an area 28 m2 (300 ft2). The urban forests grow 10 times faster than conventional plantation; they are 100 times more bio-diverse and have 30 times more green surface area. The entire development process is 100% organic with no addition of chemicals and pesticides. They also have 30 times more CO2 absorption capacity and 30 times better noise, and dust reduction ability, than the conventional tree plantation.

At time of plantation

After four months

Urban Forest at NED University

Link to relevant website

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Professional Memberships

  1. International Water Association (IWA)
  2. Global Environment Centre, Japan (GEC)
  3. Pakistan Engineering Council (PEC)
  4. Institute of Engineers, Pakistan (IEP)

Selected Publications

JOURNAL PAPERS

  1. Anwar Z., Mustafa A., Ali M., (2019). Appraisal of process safety management practices in refining sector of Pakistan. Process Safety and Environmental Protection 128, 36–40. (IF 4.384)
  2. Saleem F., Kamran Azim M., Mustafa A., Kori J.A., Hussain, M.S., (2019). Metagenomic profiling of fresh water lakes at different altitudes in Pakistan. Ecological Informatics 51, 73–81. (IF 2.310)
  3. Ali, M, Mustafa A., Saleem M., (2018) Comparative Study between Indigenous Natural Coagulants and Alum for Microalgae Harvesting. Arabian Journal for Science and Engineering, 44, 6453-6463. (IF 1.518)
  4. Saleem F., Mustafa A., Kori J.A., Hussain, M.S., Kamran Azim M. (2018). Metagenomic characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water supply system of a mega city. Microbial Ecology 76(4), 899–910. (IF 3.611)
  5. Mustafa A., Kamran Azim M., Raza Z., Ahmed Kori J. (2018), BTEX removal in a modified free water surface wetland. Chemical Engineering Journal 333(1), 451-455. Available online. (IF 8.355)
  6. Mustafa A., Scholz M., Khan S., Ghaffar A. (2013), Application of solar disinfection for treatment of contaminated public water supply in a developing country: field observations. Journal of Water and Health 11 (1), 135-145. (IF 1.683)
  7. Mustafa A., Scholz M. (2011), Characterization of Microbial Communities Transforming and Removing Nitrogen in Wetlands. Wetlands, 31(3):583-592. (IF 1.854)
  8. Mustafa A., Scholz M. (2011), Nutrient Accumulation in Typha latifolia L. and Sediment of a Representative Integrated Constructed Wetland. Water Air & Soil Pollution, 219 (1-4), 329-341. (IF 1.774)
  9. Kayranli B., Scholz M., Mustafa A., Hoffman O., Harrington R. (2010), Performance Evaluation of Integrated Constructed Wetlands treating Domestic Wastewater. Water Air & Soil Pollution, 210 (1-4), 435-451. (IF 1.774)
  10. Kayranli B., Scholz M., Mustafa A. and Hedmark Å. (2010), Carbon Storage and Fluxes within Freshwater Wetlands: a Critical Review. Wetlands, 30 (1), 111-124. (IF 1.854)
  11. Scholz M., Harrington R., Carroll P. and Mustafa A. (2010), Monitoring of Nutrient Removal within Integrated Constructed Wetlands (ICW), Desalination, 250 (1), 356-360. (IF 6.035)
  12. Mustafa A., Scholz M., Harrington R. and Carroll P. (2009), Long-term Performance of a Representative Integrated Constructed. (IF 3.406)
  13. Zhang L., Scholz M., Mustafa A. and Harrington R. (2008), Application of the Self-organizing Map as a Prediction Tool for an Integrated Constructed Wetland Agroecosystem Treating Agricultural Runoff. Bioresource Technology, 100 (2), 559-565. (IF 6.669)
  14. Zhang L., Scholz M., Mustafa A. and Harrington R. (2008), Assessment of the Nutrient Removal Performance in Integrated Constructed Wetlands with the Self-organizing Map. Water Research, 42 (13), 3519-3527. (IF  7.913)
  15. Carty A., Scholz M., Heal K., Gouriveau F. and Mustafa A. (2008), The Universal Design, Operation and Maintenance Guidelines for Farm Constructed Wetlands (FCW) in Temperate Climates, Bioresource Technology, 99 (15), 6780-6792. (IF 6.669)
  16. Scholz M., Harrington R., Carroll P. and Mustafa A. (2007), The Integrated Constructed Wetlands (ICW) Concept, Wetlands, 27 (2), 337-354. (IF 1.854)

CONFERENCE PAPERS 

  1. Mustafa A. (2019), Nature-based Solutions for Sustainable Water Management,1st National Conference of Environment & Sustainable Development, 29th March, 2019, Sindh Madressatul Islam University, Karachi, Pakistan.
  2. Mustafa A. (2018), Decentralized Wastewater Treatment System for Sustainable Wastewater Management, A.NERGY, Incheon National University, 31st October – 02nd  November, 2018, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
  3. Mustafa A., Ali M., (2018), Waste Materials As Substrates in Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands Treating Domestic Wastewater, 9th International Conference on Waste Management and the Environment, 17th to 19th  September, 2018, Seville, Spain.
  4. Mustafa A. (2017), Floating Constructed Wetland for Improving Wastewater Treatment Efficiency of a Pond System, A.NERGY, Incheon National University, 18th to 20th October, 2017, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
  5. Mustafa A. (2016), Performance Evaluation of a Low-cost and Low-energy Wastewater Treatment System, 1st International Conference on Environmental  Engineering and Management (ICEEM-2016) June 04, 2016, Karachi, Pakistan.
  6. Mustafa A. and Raza Z., (2015), Free Water Surface Wetland System for Treatment of Produced Water from a Gas Field. In: Dotro, G., Gagnon, V.(Eds.), 6th  International Symposium on Wetland Pollutant Dynamics and Control, Annual Conference of the Constructed Wetland Association “WETPOL 2015”, 13th to 18th  September, 2015, York, United Kingdom, pp. 114-115.
  7. Mustafa A., (2015), Constructed wetlands for sustainable wastewater treatment. In: Arif, F. Lodi, S. Gazder, U., 7th International Civil Engineering Congress, “ICEC-2015”, 12th to 13th June 2015, Karachi, Pakistan, pp. 104-108.
  8. Mustafa A., Saba Q., Khan S., (2015), Microbial Contamination in Drinking Water and Incidence of Waterborne Diseases in Mega City of a Developing Country- Karachi, Pakistan. In: Arif, F. Lodi, S. Gazder, U., 7th International Civil Engineering Congress, “ICEC-2015”, 12th to 13th June 2015, Karachi, Pakistan, pp. 139-145.
  9. Mustafa A. and Ali F., (2014), Treatment of Refinery Wastewater using Vertical Flow Constructed Wetlands. In: Zhou, Q., Zhai, J., (Eds.), Conference Proceedings 14th IWA Specialized Group Conference on "Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control", 12-16 October 2014, Shanghai, China, pp. 410-416.
  10. Mustafa A. and Ali M., (2014), Evaluation of an Urban Wetland: Water Quality, Ecosystem Services, Public Perception and Restoration. In: Zhou, Q., Zhai, J., (Eds.), Conference Proceedings 14th IWA Specialized Group Conference on "Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control", 12-16 October 2014, Shanghai, China, pp. 770-775.
  11. Mustafa A., (2013), Constructed Wetland for Wastewater Treatment and Reuse: A Case Study of Developing Country. In 1st Journal Conference on Environmental Science and Development (JCESD 2013 1st), Rome, Italy (24-25 February 2013). ISSN 2010-0264, Volume 4, 20-24.
  12. Mustafa A., Scholz M., Read F., Davenport R. and Harrington R., (2010), Characterization of Microbial Communities Removing Nitrogen in an Integrated Constructed Wetland Treating Agricultural Wastewater. Masi F. (Ed.). In Proceedings of the 12th International Water Association International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, Venice, Italy (4-9 October 2010). ISBN 978-88-6060-300-5, Volume 1, 691-698. 
  13. Kayranli B., Scholz M., Mustafa A. and Hedmark Å. (2009), Review of Carbon Storage within Wetlands. In J. M. Bayona and J. Garcia (Eds.), Proceedings on CD of 3rd Wetland Pollutant Dynamics and Control WETPOL 2009 (20-24/09/09), Barcelona, Spain. ISBN-10: 978-84-692-5587-2. pp. 329-330.
  14. Mustafa A., Scholz M. and Harrington R. (2009), Characterization of Microbial Communities Removing Nitrogen within an Integrated Constructed Wetland Treating Rural Runoff. In J. M. Bayona and J. Garcia (Eds.), Proceedings on CD of 3rd  Wetland Pollutant Dynamics and Control WETPOL 2009 (20-24/09/09), Barcelona, Spain. ISBN-10: 978-84-692-5587-2. pp. 111-112. 
  15. Mustafa A., Scholz M., Zhang L., Harrington R. and Carroll P. (2008), Assessment of the Long-term Performance of a Representative Integrated Constructed Wetland for Treating Farmyard Runoff, 10th British Hydrological Society Symposium 2008 (15-18 September 2008), Sustainable Hydrology for the 21st Century, Exeter, UK, pp. 445-451. 
  16. Mustafa A., Scholz M., Harrington R. and Carroll P. (2008), Control of Nutrients with Integrated Constructed Wetlands. Crighton K. and Audsley R. (Eds.). In Proceedings of the Scottish Agriculture College and Scottish Environment Protection Agency Conference (26-27/03/2008). ISBN 1-85482-867-3, Scottish Agriculture College and Scottish Environment Protection Agency Edinburgh, UK, 6 pages. 
  17. Scholz M., Harrington R., Carroll P. and Mustafa A. (2007), Development of the Integrated Constructed Wetlands (ICW) Concept. Kungolos A., Aravossis K., Karagiannidis A. and Samaras P. (Eds.). In Proceedings of the Society for Ecotoxicology Conference and the International Conference on Environmental Management, Engineering, Planning and Economics (24-28/06/2007), ISBN 978-960-89818-0-5, Vol. 2, pp. 1107-1112, Skiathos Island, Greece. Grafima Publishing, Thessaloniki, Greece. 

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Teaching

Undergraduate
  • Environmental Engineering – I
  • Environmental Engineering – II
Postgraduate
  • Physico Chemical Processes in Environmental Engineering
  • Advanced Wastewater Treatment Engineering & Design
  • Water Quality Management

Other Activities

Training of Professionals

  • Designed and organized a two-days short course on “Low-cost Wastewater Treatment Technologies” 
  • Designed and organized a two-days short course on “Water Supply and Wastewater Treatment Services” 
  • Designed and organized a two-days short course on “Membrane Desalination” 
  • Designed and organized a two-days short course on “Industrial Wastewater Treatment”

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Media/News

Contact

Email Contacts

atifm@neduet.edu.pk
atifmenv11@yahoo.com 

Current Contact (Pakistan):

Postal Address:

Dr. Atif Mustafa
Department of Environmental Engineering
NED University of Engineering & Technology University Road 
Karachi-75270 Pakistan

Telephonic Contact

Tel Off: (92-21) 99261261 Ext. 2346

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